What are some family traditions you do that are not holiday related?

TRANSCRIPT

[Brent]

Welcome to the Intentional Family Moment. Take a moment with us as we discuss our thoughts on your family related questions, then join us in our weekly challenge as we work together to become more intentional in our families. This is Episode sixteen hosted by married Coriaria founders Brent and Michelle. This episode is brought to you by Quilted Memoir – stitch together your memories. Learn more at quiltedmemoir.com.

[Michelle]

Today’s question is, what are some family traditions you do that are not holiday related?

Well, I think the first thing that comes to mind because it was relatively recent is the fact that our kids get to participate in a cousin camp, which is a lot of fun and gives them time to bond with their their grandparents. And for us, I feel very blessed that they got to bond with their great grandparents as well in that process, and their cousins. It’s put together by Grandma, they get to hang out together as cousins for a couple of days and learn different things about their ancestors, about their family, different activities, crafts, all that fun stuff to make sure that they have that time together in that context with extended family.

[Brent]

Another family tradition that comes to my mind is that we have an intentional date night evening every week. That is typically on Fridays, and it’s not as glamorous as a date night might always seem to be, but we always intentionally set that time aside to be our date evening. Usually it involves us eating out and having some activity, whether that’s an activity that we might already be planning on doing anyway, like needing to go to a specific store for shopping or something. But every time it is always an intentional time that we set aside where we’re intentionally putting away electronic devices and focusing in on each other.

[Michelle]

And same goes for our Monday family evenings.

[Brent]

That’s true.

[Michelle]

Which is basically the same thing, but with the entire family.

[Brent]

Yeah, it’s the whole family and its oriented surround activity and spending time together as a family frequently at home.

Twice a year, we get together to spend time with family and listen to inspiration from church leaders that we have in April in October, and that usually involves making some treats and maybe a nicer breakfast and other other things but it’s always a family event to connect together on that as well.

[Michelle]

We also have some seasonal type traditions as far as a specific type of family night that we do together prior to back to school, for example. Being able to base traditions on seasons is helpful because it’s a good reminder, or around birthdays that are not necessarily holidays, birthdays of loved ones that have passed or for each other the way that we celebrate birthdays become a tradition as well.

[Brent]

I think that drawing into family stories and histories can be an excellent way to create family traditions that are not holiday related in the general holiday calendar sense. But if you were to go and do research on your family’s background in history, and you were just to discover either region specific holidays that you may not celebrate where you happen to be from that are celebrated where you where your ancestors happened to be. For instance, both of us have experience with some countries in Europe where they celebrate birthdays, but more importantly, it seems they celebrate name days, and that’s not something that we do in the United States. But if that was something that you found was in your history, then you’d be able to find that maybe one of your children has a name day on a specific day and and celebrate that name day, and that’s a little different than a traditional holiday experience.

Another thing that comes to mind with that as well would be celebrating birthdays for ancestors who may have already passed on. But celebrating and remembering them as well could be part of family routines with traditions and developing a rich family culture around your heritage.

[Michelle]

I think the gist of how we approach it is that we really like traditions, we like doing things because it gives us a specific way to spend time together that we already know is going to happen. But they’re not necessarily complicated. They don’t have to be. They can be if it’s fun. If there’s something you really want to get into, just taking the time to traditionally spend bonding time together with the general topic is always great.

[Brent]

So as far as challenges for this particular week, what is a challenge that comes to mind for focusing in on family traditions that we can develop in our homes?

[Michelle]

I think sharing those family traditions was a great way to start because it gives people their ideas on things that they might want to incorporate into their own families. We can share some details on our blog of Grandma camp or cousin camp, and how that works and because that was a lot of fun. But I think hearing listeners’ ideas to would be a lot of fun, because there might be things that we can incorporate as well.

[Brent]

Thank you for joining us. Now go home and change the world by being more intentional with your family.


Check out our “Cousin Camp” tradition how-to in this post.

1 Comment

  1. Candace

    Reply

    I love all of these ideas! I especially love the idea of creating traditions around ancestors birthdays, such a great way to connect family history and family time together. I am brainstorming more ways that our family can have traditions unrelated to holidays, I love all the suggestions!

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