What are some family fun activities to do on a budget?

TRANSCRIPT

[Brent]

Welcome to the intentional family moment. Take a moment with us as we discuss our thoughts on your family related questions. Then join us in our weekly challenge as we work together to become more intentional in our families.

This is Episode 14, hosted by married Coriaria founders Brent and Michelle. This episode is brought to you by Everflect – Your couple’s council assistant. Learn more at Everflect.com.

[Michelle]

Today’s question is: What are some family fun activities to do on a budget?

[Brent]

I think a lot of this is going to depend on the ages of those involved and what your budget is because a million dollars could be a budget but be very big budget.

[Michelle]

I think the easy cop out is to say, well, we have a pinterest full of ideas and we have a website full of ideas, but I think it’d be more fun to talk about examples that we have really enjoyed or in general, how you can take any activity as simple as going to the park and make it more intentional.

[Brent]

I think that something that comes to mind first and foremost is that frequently when we’re having a hard time choosing what to do, whether that’s a meal or an activity or something else, I think that it is that we might have too many choices, and we have difficulty trying to constrain down what we’re going to focus. Something that I think has been helpful for us is to ask the twenty percent of everything question, which is that there’s five or six categories of things that we consider, things like social, intellectual, creative, service, physical, or spiritual, different activities that could fall into those buckets. And so when we’re trying to choose something to do, we start by choosing one of those categories. That helps us to narrow it down into what we are going to consider as an activity.

[Michelle]

So some of those are pretty easy go-tos when you’re talking about budget, because almost anything service related is going to be time spent in a charity time helping a neighbor in their yard. The other categories are a little bit harder to make sure that you stay in the right balance financially.

[Brent]

Yeah, it can be. I do think that there’s this concept of a “naturehood” that gets talked about for physical activities, that there’s a surprising amount of green space in many places. I’m speaking about the United States, but I feel like this would apply broadly anywhere where there are parks and other things that can be pretty close to where people live. And if you go and look for them, then you might find that a lot of them would be free activities right out of the gate.

[Michelle]

And you can take those and turn them into more intentional. More than just going to the park. You can create a scavenger hunt for any age, really, but especially for toddler/Elementary School age kids, it’s kind of fun to do stuff like that. Same goes for other free options in neighborhoods like libraries. There’s a lot of fun things you can do at the library for free. More than just going to look at books. A typical date night example is to go and find a couple books that you think describe the other person or to share your favorite childhood books. Or so you could do a scavenger hunt. The library, too. There’s lots of different options to turn a typical experience into something a little more intentional.

[Brent]

Something that can also be a lot of fun on a budget, If we’re talking about actually spending money because many of these activities we’ve discussed would be basically free if you have a pretty tight budget. But you’re still interested in spending that on an activity, something that can be fun is to split up whatever the amount of money happens to be, and to come up with some competition based on using that resource. So it could be going to a thrift shop and seeing who can find the coolest thing. And you don’t have to buy the thing necessarily. You know, maybe it’s just whoever finds the coolest item at the garage sale.

Another option would be to see how far can you make that money go in a service activity. If you’re going to, you know, take the time to go and serve some place. Would it be possible to maybe brainstorm different things that they could need that you’d be able to then purchase with those resources. There are a lot of things that you can consider in ways that you can divide that up. But ultimately, making it into a competition can be a lot of fun.

[Michelle]

You can also take what you already have budgeted for things that you need and turn that into something intentional. For example, we just bought pajamas for our child because they outgrew them. But we specifically chose pajamas that were related to a current holiday, and that became almost like a dress up. And so it became an activity, and it ended up that we put on a play of sorts in the musical, all because of something that was already planned in the budget. And so that one was a little bit less intentional. What if you decided to do something like that intentionally? To create a bigger experience out of something that you’re already planning that could make a difference, to even as simple as making dinner. So how can you turn that into a cooking competition or something along those lines?

[Brent]

So what would be a great activity or challenge for this week?

[Michelle]

Maybe to think of something that you already have planned or budgeted and to turn it into something more intentional and creative, and to share that idea with us so that we can turn around and give that idea to other listeners.

[Brent]

Absolutely. I think at the heart of a lot of these activities is the meaningful activity is not something that requires a whole lot of money. It’s instead a matter of intentionality and especially trying to be intentional, informing those connections with the people that we love most. So we encourage you to get out there and try that. Share what works and what doesn’t, and we look forward to hearing from you.

Thank you for joining us. Now go home and change the world by being more intentional with your family.

1 Comment

  1. Candace

    Reply

    I love the idea of using different categories such as physical, spiritual, etc to choose what to do together as a family. Makes for a more unique opportunity and could very easily lead to spending less money on family time together.

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